4 USPS Mail Carrier Interview Questions and Answers

Updated on: July 27, 2020
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USPS Mail Carrier Interview questions are important, but how you answer them is even more so.

When you are presented with a particularly difficult question, take a moment to think and reflect on it. Ask yourself, “What is the interviewer really hoping to find out about me?”

A USPS mail carrier will be tested on more than his mail delivery skills. Confidentiality and integrity come into play here, and he will be required to prove that he is capable of holding both up.

See also: Mail Carrier Resume Sample

The following are 4 possible interview questions (and good answers) that you might be asked:

4 Common Questions and Answers for USPS Mail Carrier Interview

1. What do you know about significant events in the history of the United States Postal Service?

Some of the significant events of USPS include Benjamin Franklin’s commission as the first Postmaster General of the organization in 1775 and the fact that the US issued its first postal cards in 1873. Other significant dates include the introduction of airmail service in 1918 and the launching of the public Internet site in 1994.

2. What are the two facets of working as a USPS mail carrier?

The first one is office work, where a mail carrier has to inspect his vehicle, retrieve mail cases, and place them on to the vehicle in a safe manner. The other is the delivery part, where the mail carrier charts routes and looks for mail destinations.

3. If you were presented with an opportunity to peek into a box that you have been asked to deliver, would you take the opportunity?

No. I would not. My business is to deliver and not see what is inside the packet. Customer confidentiality is very important to me.

4. What is one skill that is considered trivial but is actually very important during mail delivery?

Comparing addresses. It is considered as a “given” that a mail carrier will deliver mail to the address given. In actuality, it is quite easy to miss a street number and end up at the wrong address.