Dispensing Audiologist Job Description

Position Overview

Patients who have hearing disorders often end up in a dispensing audiologist’s office, where he or she manages diagnostic tests to determine which hearing disorders they have.

These people administer hearing aid tests and handle fitting activities, irrespective of the age of the patients.

Position Requirements

Working as a dispensing audiologist requires a master’s degree in audiology, backed up by some experience in the field. Some states may require licensure as well.

Excellent oral and written communication skills are required to work at this position, as one has to keep in contact with patients and their families. Strong problem-solving skills and a great ability to handle diagnostic testing is part of the work of a dispensing audiologist.

Since working as a dispensing audiologist is complicated, it is crucial that you possess just the right type of skills to be considered eligible for this position. Some procedures that people working in this position perform include diagnostic evaluations of hearing, prevention of hearing loss, and rehabilitation services for auditory problems. Moreover, dispensing audiologists need to be able to determine if patients’ issues are hereditary, occupational hazards, or due to an event such as an accident. Since this is a great part of the work, it is important for them to be exceptionally talented in diagnostics.

Some of the primary duties of an individual working as a dispensing audiologist include:

 

Dispensing Audiologist Duties & Responsibilities

 

• Engage patients and their families in conversation to determine their hearing issues and problems.

• Assess patients’ situations and problems by checking them for symptoms of hearing problems.

• Determine if patients’ hearing issues are due to hereditary problems, occupational hazards, or because of an accident.

• Administer a variety of diagnostic audiological tests, including air and bone conduction audiometry, and speech audiometry to determine type and degree of hearing impairment.

• Interpret results to determine if any communication problems are evident, and provide appropriate recommendations.

• Select, fit, and verify appropriate amplification, such as appropriate recommendations for communication strategies.

• Refer patients for medical diagnosis for correlation conditions, placing special emphasis on their wellbeing and health.

• Provide appropriate follow-up to ensure that patients return for their appointments.

• Perform fitting of the appropriate hearing aid device or technology, and provide ongoing rehabilitation support.

• Counsel patients with hearing impairments, in a bid to make them more comfortable with their present situations.

• Provide education to patients and their families to ensure that they understand limitations, and can work successfully with them.

• Create and maintain patients’ files, and ensure that they are updated on a regular basis.






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